I was going to be a baseball player

In middle school, one of my teachers asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I remember timidly responding, “I want to be a baseball player.” Well, it wasn’t for a few more years that I would lose my love for the sport (and haven’t ever regained it :)) but up until then, I believed I could do it.

2 me and Whitney Williams

me in 5th grade sporting a Semper Paratus shirt.

Childish dreams, that’s what it was. I didn’t have the talent, and even if I had the drive and the willingness to work hard at it, I didn’t have the talent. Have I mentioned that I didn’t have the talent? But kids don’t think about what it actually takes to make it in professional sports. Or anything professional, really. It takes time, dedication, and oh yeah, talent.

The last year I played organized baseball was in 8th grade. Something flipped and I didn’t care to play anymore. When I went off to college (I say “went off” like my parents didn’t live right down the street), I played intramural softball for a winning team, albeit we were all students not playing for any school-sanctioned team of any sport whatsoever, but we were the best intramural team at FSU for 3 or 4 years running. #stillhavemyjersey #livinginthepast

As a grown man, yes I’m a grown man!, I love playing softball and even if most leagues I’ve been in fall into the “beer league” category, I’m still competitive and I’ll push a guy if it comes to that. Hmm, maybe I’m just living out the broken dreams of a middle school kid who just wants to come back to his hometown and ask his dad, “Are you prouda me, Pops?” like some dramatic New Jersey school dropout with a strong accent.

It’ll never happen, though, because my dad doesn’t go by “Pops”. Dang it!

-Out of the Wilderness

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Nature’s lesson on: Gun safety

I’m starting this post off with a little information about roadkill, but hang with me because it’s relevant to the topic of gun safety.

So there isn’t a centralized datasource on what the most common roadkill is, but according to this map deer, possum, raccoon, squirrel, and armadillo are up near the top. On the interstate, I’d guess deer as the most common.

screen-shot-2017-01-04-at-8-19-51-am

What don’t we see on this map? Any sort of bird, and the one I want to focus on here is the crow, or vulture (because on the interstate specifically, these are the birds most commonly seen).

crowMy theory is that the reason we never see dead crows on the side of the interstate is because they’ve learned what to do and not to do, not by avoiding the interstate altogether, but the exact opposite. Hanging around and becoming comfortable and aware of the danger. Familiarity.

I think this kind of behavior can be applied to gun safety as well. The more you’re around these weapons, learning about them, shooting them, the more comfortable and aware you’ll be of their danger. Familiarity. To avoid them altogether is like a deer approaching the interstate. Unaware, uninformed, unfamiliar with the danger and risk.

The example of the crow can be applied to other areas of life as well. I’m thinking about sex education (the more you know, the better decisions you can make). Instead of ignoring the topic completely, talk about it, discuss it, become familiar with what sex is and isn’t.

Sports. The more you’re immersed in a sport, the more you’ll know, maybe the better you’ll be at playing. If you avoided watching football, reading about it, hearing about it on TV or radio, how familiar will you be about it? Not very.

There are all kinds of real-life applications of the crow on the interstate story.

There is no mystery to the crow about the interstate because where there is mystery, there is mistake. And I can’t recall seeing any dead crows (or vultures) on any interstate I’ve ever travelled on. They don’t make mistakes.

For gun safety, become familiar with them and in that way, you’ll be aware, informed and avoid the mystery that can often times lead to mistakes.
sigsauer-Out of the Wilderness

 

Fantasy Football 2010: Draft Order

As another year of fantasy football begins, I’m spending time preparing my draft order. I play in a keeper league and my three keepers are:
Tony Romo (QB)
Greg Jennings (WR)
Brandon Marshall (WR)

Unavailable players are: Ronnie Brown, Ray Rice, Anquan Boldin, Philip Rivers, Dwayne Bowe, Michael Bush, Ryan Grant, Roddy White, Steve Smith (CAR), Maurice Jones-Drew, Rashard Mendenhall, Shonne Green, Adrian Peterson, Michael Turner, Drew Brees, Peyton Manning, Joseph Addai, LeSean McCoy, Aaron Rodgers, Randy Moss, Cedric Benson, Andre Johnson, Steven Jackson, DeAngelo Williams, Calvin Johnson (DET), Larry Fitzgerald, Dallas Clark, Chris Johnson (TEN), Frank Gore, Tom Brady

Positions I need filled are running back, a couple more wide receiver spots, a tight end, kicker and defense. So of all the available talent out there, who would you recommend I pick first? Second? Third? I’ve done some research myself, but I’m curious about the small crowd of people who follow fantasy football managers and read blogs. If that’s you, tell me what you think! Should my first pick (9th out of 12 in the first round) be a running back, another wide receiver, or a different position? 

Here’s how I did in the draft.

Spring Is Here!

I recently noticed the leaves on the trees in my backyard.

Spring is here!

One tree has a bunch of spinny things that float down to the ground. Another has some tiny green leaves. This weekend I will mow my grass.

Spring is here!

Television stations are airing finales and cueing up the re-runs. Flowers are blooming, the sun is shining overhead.

All this means one thing: Baseball is boring. And Spring is here!

Put down your Wii controllers and pick up a tennis racket. Turn off American Idol and go take a walk under the stars!

Spring is here… and the NFL draft already happened!