Making lyric videos

In the past few years, I’ve really taken a liking to putting together lyric videos using music by popular artists. One of the first was for NeedtoBreathe’s “Multiplied” which I’ll post at the bottom. But I’m so happy with how my latest project went. Equipment used: GoPro Hero3, Roxant handheld stabilizer, DJI Mavic Air, edited on Final Cut Pro X.

Here’s my take on Lauren Daigle’s “Rescue”…


and NeedtoBreathe, “Multiplied”…

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Feels like rain

It was one of those unexpected moments that turned out to be the highlight of my day. I was skipping rocks at Percy Priest Lake here in Nashville, waiting for my GoPro to record enough pictures to make a time-lapse of the sunset. Across the lake the marina slips were full of houseboats docked for the night.

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I could hear distant voices of boat owners chatting back and forth. Music played as the soundtrack of their late afternoon. I assume they were cleaning their boats, as many boat owners like to do. Maybe they were scrubbing and washing the week away, or prepping for an upcoming voyage.

The lake was quiet enough that the sound from a boat stereo carried over the calm water to where I was sitting on lake pebbles, admiring the clouds and the active ducks. Another song began to play, one I’d never heard before. Somehow it captured, and represented, summer. I sat back and just let myself enjoy it, as I knew the moment wouldn’t last forever.

-Out of the Wilderness

Creating time-lapse videos

img_20170926_133846307_hdr.jpgLately I’ve been on a time-lapse kick with my GoPro. Not sure why I’m obsessed with them right now but I am. I’ve recorded a lot of clouds, shadows, and a few other things. The settings I observed that work best are as follows:

Device: GoPro Hero3

Clouds: 1 pic every 5 seconds

Shadows: 1 pic every 10 seconds

Rivers/water: 1 pic every 5 seconds

People: 1 pic every 2 seconds

img_20170926_124717998_hdr.jpgYou will need at least a total of 210 frames to make a 7 second video (30 frames = 1 second), so make sure to do the math on how long you’ll need to record to get 210 frames, more or less depending on what you want. If you’re shooting 1 pic every 5 seconds, that’s 12 frames per minute which means for a 7-second time-lapse video, you’ll need to record for 17.5 minutes (210 frames divided by 12 frames a minute = 17.5 minutes).

If you’re recording a frame every 10 seconds, it’ll take longer to get a 7-second video. The math works out to be 35 minutes of record time.

Here’s a few of the time-lapse shots I’ve recorded recently.

-Out of the Wilderness